Masterclass: Spirituality and Wellbeing at End of Life

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New Zealand is often called a ‘secular’ society where formal religion is not practiced, although people may see themselves as ‘spiritual’.

There is a growing body of evidence that explores this within a New Zealand context.  The Centre for Ageing and Spirituality in Auckland has led many symposia on this topic and research has been done through Richard Egan at the University of Otago, Dunedin.

Charles Waldegrave from The Family Centre in Lower Hutt defines it as:

Spirituality can be considered as being essentially about primary relationships. In this regard there are at least four qualitative relationships that express spirituality, and these are the relationships between: people and their environment (land, mountains, sea, sky, etc.); people and other people in terms of justice and love (families, communities, nations, etc); people and their and other persons' heritage (ancestry, culture, history, etc.); and people and the numinous (that which is other, beyond the physical, transcendent, what some people refer to as God  (Waldegrave 2003)

This day explores the continuum of spiritual and secular beliefs;  from formalised religion across cultures;  Māori, Pasifika, Jewish, Buddhist, Hindu and Catholic traditions to the secular: atheists, agnostics, and explorers of mystery through other realms, such as mindfulness and meditation.

The day is designed for health professionals and community and social care workers.

VenueDate/TimeCost
Malvina Major, 134 Burma Rd, Khandallah25 October
8:30am - 4:30pm
$90.00 - Masterclass: Spirituality & Wellbeing at End of LifeLogin